MS Hyper V-All About

What is MS Hyper V Server?

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Hyper-V, codenamed Viridian[1] and formerly known as Windows Server Virtualization, is a native hypervisor; it can create virtual machines on x86-64 systems.[2] Starting with Windows 8, Hyper-V supersedes Windows Virtual PC as the hardware virtualization component of the client editions of Windows NT. A server computer running Hyper-V can be configured to expose individual virtual machines to one or more networks.

Hyper-V was first released alongside Windows Server 2008 and has since become a staple of the Windows Server family.

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 Sample Hyper V Network Configuration Topology

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 Microsoft -Hyper V Architecture Component.  2012 R2.

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History of Hyper V 2012 R2

 

Before Windows Server 2012 R2:

First we will review the Hyper-V improvements that the earlier versions of Windows Server provide. Beginning with Windows Server 2008, server virtualization via Hyper-V technology has been an integral part of the operating system. A new version of Hyper-V is included as a part of Windows Server 2008 R2, and this was further enhanced with Windows Server 2008 R2 operating system with Service Pack 1 (SP1).

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There are two manifestations of the Hyper-V technology: 

  • Hyper-V is the hypervisor-based virtualization feature of Windows Server 2008 R2.
  • Microsoft Hyper-V Server is the hypervisor-based server virtualization product that allows customers to consolidate workloads onto a single physical server. This is available as a free download.

Windows Server 2008 R2 Hyper V enhancements

With the launch of Windows Server 2008 R2 Hyper-V, Microsoft introduced a number of compelling capabilities to help organizations reduce costs, whilst increasing agility and flexibility. Key features introduced included:

  • Live Migration – Enabling the movement of virtual machines with no interruption or downtime.
  • Cluster Shared Volumes – Highly scalable and flexible use of shared storage, such as System Area Network (SAN) for virtual machines.
  • Processor Compatibility – Increase the flexibility for live migration across hosts with differing CPU architectures.
  • Storage Hot Add  – Flexibly add or remove storage to and from virtual machines.
  • Improved Virtual Networking Performance – Support for Jumbo Frames and Virtual Machine Queue (VMQ).

 

Scalability Improvements From 2008 R2

Hyper‑V in Windows Server 2008 R2 supported configuring virtual machines with a maximum of four virtual processors and up to 64 GB of memory. However, IT organizations increasingly want to use virtualization when they deploy mission‑critical, tier-1 business applications. Large, demanding workloads such as On-Line Transaction Processing (OLTP) databases and online transaction analysis (OLTA) solutions typically run on systems with 16 or more processors and demand large amounts of memory. For this class of workloads, more virtual processors and larger amounts of virtual machine memory are a core requirement.

Hyper‑V in Windows Server 2012 R2 expands support for host processors and memory. New features include support for up to 64 virtual processors and 1 TB of memory for Hyper‑V guests, a new VHDX virtual hard disk format with larger disk capacity of up to 64 TB, and additional resiliency. These features help ensure that the virtualization infrastructure can support the configuration of large, high-performance virtual machines to support workloads that might need to scale up significantly.

Significant improvements have been made across the board, with Hyper-V now supporting increased cluster sizes, a significantly higher number of active virtual machines per host, and additionally, more advanced performance features such as in-guest Non Uniform Memory Access (NUMA). This ensures that customers can achieve the highest levels of scalability, performance and density for their mission-critical workloads.

Hyper-V Requirements

Important: The highly diverse scope of potential deployments makes it unrealistic to state “recommended” system requirements that would be generally applicable. For the best results, conduct test deployments to determine appropriate system requirements for your particular deployment scenarios.

Processor

Hyper-V has hardware requirements above and beyond a standard installation of Windows. Though the minimum processor requirement is 1.4 MHz, this is specifically for the host operating system and does not consider the requirements of virtual machines. In any case, hardware-assisted virtualization is required to support Hyper-V, this includes Intel VT and AMD Virtualization (AMD-V). In addition, hardware-enforced DEP is required. Hardware-enforced DEP marks all memory locations in a process as non-executable unless the location explicitly contains executable code. A class of attacks exists that tries to insert and run code from non-executable memory locations. DEP helps prevent these attacks by intercepting them and raising an exception. This setting can be found in Intel based systems as Execute Disable Bit (XD), or in AMD based systems as no-execute page-protection (NX). Finally, though not required, SLAT leverages AMD-V Rapid Virtualization Indexing (RVI) and Intel VT Extended Page Tables (EPT)  technology to reduce the overhead incurred during virtual to physical address mapping performed for virtual machines. Through RVI or EPT respectively, AMD-V and Intel VT processors maintain address mappings and perform (in hardware) the two levels of address space translations required for each virtual machine, reducing the complexity of the Windows hypervisor and the context switches needed to manage virtual machine page faults.

 Memory

Windows Server 2012 R2 requires a minimum of 512 MB of RAM, however, as with processor requirements, this minimum only meets the need of the host operating system. Additional RAM will be required to operate virtual machines.

 Network

In terms of network requirements, to provide virtual machines access to the network, at least a single network adapter is required in the host. Additional network adapters are recommended for both redundancy and traffic requirements that will be further discussed

Software Requirements (for supported Guest operating system)

Hyper-V includes a software package for supported guest operating systems that improves integration between the physical computer and the virtual machine. This package is referred to as integration services.

In general, you install this package in the guest operating system as a separate procedure after you set up the operating system in the virtual machine. However, some operating systems have integration systems built-in and do not require a separate installation.

Supported Guest Operating System -Microsoft

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As part of Microsoft’s continuing commitment to make Hyper-V the best all-around virtual platform for hosting providers, Linux support for Hyper-V in Windows Server 2012 R2 has now been enhanced in the following ways:

More Robust Linux Support

Hyper-V has supported installing and running various Linux distributions or flavors in virtual machines for some time now. Linux guest support in Hyper-V is especially desired by hosting providers who often like to provide their customers with a wide range of platform options for running their web applications and services. Linux (and UNIX) support in Hyper-V is also important in the enterprise space where heterogeneous IT solutions are generally the norm. Because of the needs of these customer segments, Microsoft envisions Hyper-V virtualization as cross-platform from the metal up and supports a wide range of Linux distributions. Microsoft also includes robust Linux/UNIX capabilities across the entire System Center family of products and also in Windows Azure offerings as well. Linux/UNIX support is an integral part of all of these platforms and is not merely an extension of Windows-centric functionality

 Supported Guest Operating Systems- 3rd Party.

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  Improved video

A virtualized video driver is now included for Linux virtual machines to provide an enhanced video experience with better mouse support.

Dynamic Memory

Dynamic Memory is now fully supported for Linux virtual machines, including both hot-add and remove functionality. This means you can now run Windows and Linux virtual machines side-by-side on the same host machine while using Dynamic Memory to ensure fair allocation of memory resources to each virtual machine on the host.

Online VHDX resize

Virtual hard disks attached to Linux virtual machines can be resized while the virtual machine is running.

Online backup

You can now back up running Linux virtual machines to Windows Azure using the Windows Azure Online Backup capabilities of the in-box Windows Server Backup utility, System Center Data Protection Manager , or any third-party backup solution that supports backing up Hyper-V virtual machines.

Hyper V Improvement Benchmark

hypervimprovmentScalability Improvements From 2008 R2

Hyper‑V in Windows Server 2008 R2 supported configuring virtual machines with a maximum of four virtual processors and up to 64 GB of memory. However, IT organizations increasingly want to use virtualization when they deploy mission‑critical, tier-1 business applications. Large, demanding workloads such as On-Line Transaction Processing (OLTP) databases and online transaction analysis (OLTA) solutions typically run on systems with 16 or more processors and demand large amounts of memory. For this class of workloads, more virtual processors and larger amounts of virtual machine memory are a core requirement.

Hyper‑V in Windows Server 2012 R2 expands support for host processors and memory. New features include support for up to 64 virtual processors and 1 TB of memory for Hyper‑V guests, a new VHDX virtual hard disk format with larger disk capacity of up to 64 TB, and additional resiliency. These features help ensure that the virtualization infrastructure can support the configuration of large, high-performance virtual machines to support workloads that might need to scale up significantly.

New Key Feature of Windows 2012 R2 Hyper-V.

newkeyfeatueshyperv

Significant improvements have been made across the board, with Hyper-V now supporting increased cluster sizes, a significantly higher number of active virtual machines per host, and additionally, more advanced performance features such as in-guest Non Uniform Memory Access (NUMA). This ensures that customers can achieve the highest levels of scalability, performance and density for their mission-critical workloads.

Windows Server 2012 R2 includes a number of new features for Hyper-V. Each of these new features will be discussed in further detail in this WorkshopPLUS.

Management Improvements

Automatic virtual machine activation will activate all Windows Server 2012 R2 virtual machines that are running on a Hyper-V server that is running Windows Server 2012 R2 Datacenter. Generation 2 virtual machines enable a new set of features available to Windows 8 and Windows Server 2012 or later guest virtual machines. Live virtual machine export allows an IT administrator to make a copy of virtual machine while it is running, such that the new copy can be examined for issues while the original continues to run. Live migration has been improved to allow compression of live migration traffic, or to take advantage of Server Message Block (SMB) Direct, both of which significantly increase the speed of migration. Hyper-V replica has also been improved to allow more granular configuration, and to support tertiary replication.

Storage Improvements

Virtual machine disks can be resized online, either to make them larger or smaller. Storage Quality of Service (QoS) is introduced to limit the IOPs available to virtual machines, reducing the impact of noisy neighbors. Shared VHDX is introduced to provide new ways of implementing guest clustering without leaving virtual encapsulation. Storage tiering is introduced to optimize the use of various classes of storage by moving files to storage consistent with their usage. Finally, deduplication is now supported for VDI deployments.

Networking Improvements

High availability is added to network connectivity for virtual machines through protected network. Virtual receive-side scaling (RSS) combined with VMQ will provide near line rate connectivity to virtual machines.

 

References:
Hyper V Overview
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh831531.aspx

Coming Soon!!!

*How to Install.
*How to Configure .
*How To Secure.

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